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Author Topic: A Touch of Frost  (Read 7931 times)

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Charles King

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2008, 03:20:38 PM »

On the DvD's commentary section, David Jason lightly skims the conflict he had with the writer. He claimed the chain smoking wasn't going to work out because of all the takes they do during production. ... He also said that because of his success on another show--can't remember the title-- that the producers came to him and asked him what he wanted to do next. ... So he went on "Holiday" ... god, I love the English ... and read a couple of Frost books, and said that was it.

My two cents, even watered down, the TV show was pretty good.

Cheers,
Charles 8)


PS: Loved the 411 on the author. I'm going out to pick up a copy. Have to get through some Robert Little first, but I'll get to him.
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penny

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2008, 03:06:38 AM »

I know I'm straying from the topic here, but since this was mentioned by Jim, I need to ask:

Who decides if a book is published hardcover or paperback? I thought in the US every book needs to be hardcover first, and then only if it sells well it's published "mass paperback"? No. I know this is wrong and that some books are only published paperback.

So that confuses me. Also, what is better? It seems to me that hardcovers cost too much, and I always wait for the paperbacks, because multiplying the dollars into my currency is too much for me. (Although I usually buy my books in a second hand store in downtown Jerusalem.) But really, I'm sure many readers do not want to pay for the hardcover, and wouldn't the paperback be actually better - saleswise - for the writer?

Sorry for the rambling. Just curious,

Penny
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Ingrid

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2008, 09:19:24 AM »

I can answer that.  The publisher's contract offer specifies that.  In other words, the publisher decides -- though the author can refuse and hold out for hc.  The best combination (to my mind) is a hc offer, to be followed by mass market release the year afterward.  But the pb decision is also the publisher's.  The reason that combination is best is that the hc will get review attention and publicity (something pbs rarely get).  The downside is that the publisher's investment is much greater and if the hc does not earn a profit, the author will be dropped and may never publish again.

It is a bit easier to stay published in pb.

But I think in any case that Wingfield did not get much support in the U.S. and that the mass market pb publication proves that.
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penny

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2008, 02:14:50 PM »

Thanks for explaining, Ingrid. I've always been curious about that.

In this small pond (attention Ingrid!), there is no hc/pb distinction. Nowadays most fiction is published in paperback, but it's a larger book. Think hardcover size, only soft.

Penny
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JIM DOHERTY

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2008, 02:28:43 PM »

Penny,

Re your comment below:

Nowadays [in Israel] most fiction is published in paperback, but it's a larger book. Think hardcover size, only soft.

We have those over here, too.  They're called "trade paperbacks."  The cheaper, pocket-sized editions are called "mass-market paperbacks."  In the U.S., the Frost novels were published as mass-market paperback originals.

Some smaller publishers, and even occasionally big ones, will release a trade paper and hardback edition of the same books simultaneously.

jnichols

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2008, 08:17:38 AM »

Logging on after a long absence, I was drawn in by this thread. My husband Nigel, a British transplant, picked the "Touch of Frost" video to rent. David Jason is hugely famous in the UK for playing Del-Boy Trotter on a long running show called "Only Fools And Horses." I have seen a number of the Fools & Horses shows (very funny), and I was pleasantly surprised that Jason managed to make me forget the character that I associated with him in "Touch of Frost."  Now John Thaw, who played Inspector Morse, was always Inspector Morse in whatever I saw him do.

Judy
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Ingrid

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2008, 09:16:14 AM »

I recall John Thaw (a quite elderly John Thaw) do a show set on a Greek island.  He was good, but he wasn't Morse and I was disappointed.  I wanted the Morse shows (and novels) to go on and on.  Same with Frost.
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JIM DOHERTY

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2008, 02:49:47 PM »

Judy,

Re your comment below:

. . . John Thaw, who played Inspector Morse, was always Inspector Morse in whatever I saw him do.

See if you can find a couple of episodes of The Sweeney, in which Thaw, then in his mid-30's, played a hard-charging cockney inspector in the Flying Squad, Scotland Yard's motorized armed robbery detail.  Crass, crude, insubordinate, and often brutal, Detective Inspector Jack Regan was a very, very different from the gentlemanly, somewhat formal Detective Chief Inspector E. Morse, notwithstanding both characters being cops.

An even earlier cop character, when Thaw might have been in his 20's was a professional non-com in the British Army who was a member of the Special Investigations Branch of the Royal Military Police.  The name of the show was Redcap.  I've never seen one, but somehow I don't see Morse as a 20-something career Army cop.  I suspect this character was probably a lot closer to "steely old Jack Regan," as Thaw sometimes referred to him, than he was to Morse.

In fact,  I seem to recall hearing that Thaw was attracted to the Morse character precisely because he was so different from Regan, and, presumably, from the young NCO he played in Redcap.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2008, 07:21:07 PM by JIM DOHERTY »
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Ingrid

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2008, 04:57:54 PM »

Oh, now I want to see those shows.  Alas, I don't see how.
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JIM DOHERTY

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2008, 07:34:06 PM »

Ingrid,

Re your comment below:

Oh, now I want to see those shows.  Alas, I don't see how.

Both The Sweeney and Redcap are available on DVD.  These are PAL DVD's, rather than the NTSC DVD's that usually work on US televisions, but if you have an all-region DVD player (which I do), they'll work just fine.

All four seasons of The Sweeney can be found here:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Definitive-Sweeney-Complete-1-4-Discs/dp/B000V6AEPO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1201307283&sr=1-3

Elsewhere, you can also find DVD's of the TV-movie pilot, Regan.  There were also two feature-length films, based on the show, released to theatres during the original run of the series, Sweeney! and Sweeney 2.  As it happens, though the series and the pilot are only available in PAL format, there is a two-disc set of both movies available in NTSC.

For what it's worth, there were at least two novels, based on the series, that were published in hardback here in the States, despite the series never having been shown here.  IIRC, they were entitled Regan and The Crime of the Century.  The writer was Ian Kennedy Martin, who wrote the script for the pilot and was always credited as the creator, though he wrote no actual episodes of the subsequent series.

The first season of Redcap can be found here:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Redcap-Complete-First-John-Thaw/dp/B0009F68FC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1201306929&sr=1-2

The second season has also been released.

So, if you're really interested, there is a way.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2008, 03:47:32 PM by JIM DOHERTY »
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Kathy Wendorff

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2008, 06:50:52 AM »

What's the opposite of "amnesia"? Because whatever it is, Jim, I think you've got it.

Kathy W.
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Ingrid

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2008, 10:34:16 AM »

LOL!  Quite right, Kathy W.  I thought once it was photographic memory, but these days I believe that Jim takes the trouble to look things up.

Thanks, Jim.  Way too costly, I think -- especially with overseas postage.
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JIM DOHERTY

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2008, 03:48:53 PM »

Ingrid,

After all, even my memory isn't so good that I can recall long URL's off the top of my head.

JIM DOHERTY

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2008, 07:45:34 PM »

And just to prove that my memory isn't all that it could be, that second Regan novel by Martin was The DEAL of the Century, not The Crime of the Century.  And there was a third novel entitled The Manhattan File, in which D.I. Regan travels to N.Y.C.

Ingrid

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Re: A Touch of Frost
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2008, 06:10:44 PM »

Never mind.  You cannot possibly unimpress us.  :)
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